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Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 Missing Since 8 March 2014

Boeing 777-200ER registered 9M-MRO carrying 227 passengers and 12 crew, went missing on a flight to Beijing Capital International Airport from Kuala Lumpur International Airport. Name of the pilot is Zaharie Bin Ahmad Shah. The pilot of the missing Malaysia Airlines passenger jet were a middle-aged family man passionate enough about flying to build his own simulator and a 27-year-old contemplating marriage who had just graduated to the cockpit of the Boeing 777.

When Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 disappeared on a clear Saturday night from radar screens, no one could explain how the Boeing 777 had seemingly vanished. Ten days later, there is still more confusion and misinformation than solid evidence, and the aircraft with 239 people on board is still missing.

Just hours after the 12.40am flight disappeared the Malaysia Airlines chief executive, Ahmad Jauhari Yahya, said the plane was still in contact with air traffic controllers about two hours into the flight, pinning the last contact at about 2.40am [all times local], at a point 120 nautical miles off the east coast of Malaysia. But FlightAware, a flight-tracking website, showed the plane climbing to 10,700 metres (35,000ft) before disappearing from records at 1am, about 20 minutes after it took off. At 1am, the plane was scheduled to enter Vietnamese air space while flying between Malaysia and Ho Chi Minh City and did not. No distress signal was issued.

Twelve hours after the plane vanished, search and rescue teams from Malaysia, Singapore and Vietnam began looking for debris or wreckage off Vietnam. China and the Philippines soon sent their own ships and aircraft to help. A few hours later, a Vietnamese admiral told media the aircraft could have crashed in Vietnamese waters near an island – with reports of a giant oil slick and column of smoke emerging. Soon, questions over whether terrorism was involved began circulating after an Italian and an Austrian came forward to say they had not flown on the flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing, despite being listed in the flight’s manifest.

It took 70 years to locate the Titanic after it sank. In the case of the Air France 447 crash in 2009, when investigators had a better idea of where the plane went down, it was still two years before the flight recorder was found. It’s like finding a needle in 10,000 haystacks. With no definite news about what might have happened to the plane and the people on board, the father of one Chinese passenger told reporters he and other relatives were considering staging a hunger strike to push for more answers.

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